Abstract

In "The Nymph Complaining for the Death of her Faun," Andrew Marvell inserts multiple social languages into the traditional literary language of a complaining nymph and thereby tests that language in the face of outside linguistic pressures. The languages of contemporary militarism, British law, quasi-Christian theology, Canticles, and Marvell's own poetic practice enter the poem to reveal the instability and vulnerability of traditional literary languages in a period of rapid social change and extreme heteroglossia. By dialogizing the Nymph's language of complaint, then, Marvell refracts the social disorder of his time.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 137-150
Launched on MUSE
2003-02-25
Open Access
No
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