Abstract

In the past few years, we have witnessed the introduction of a bilingual-bicultural approach and an increasing skepticism of the value of manually coded English in the education of deaf children. The thrust of bilingual-bicultural programs is emphasis on using American Sign Language as the primary language of instruction. However, merely advocating something (i.e., the use of American Sign Language) in no way guarantees its successful implementation. This paper reviews the research on past usage of manually coded English in the classroom for clues as to some of the concerns that American Sign Language might face in its implementation.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-0375
Print ISSN
0002-726X
Pages
pp. 331-337
Launched on MUSE
2012-07-11
Open Access
No
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