Abstract

Sarah Scott's English novel, The History of Sir George Ellison (1766), had its broadest contemporary impact in a Philadelphia-issued epitome, The Man of Real Sensibility (1774). Considering the novel and the epitome together illustrates the instability of stories in transatlantic print culture, and important differences in transatlantic cultures and ideas. Reading both Ellisons against an important pro-American pamphlet (1774) by Scott's brother, Baron Rokeby, which shared many of the same concerns, distinguishes Scott's politics from classical republican ism and Lockean contractualism, and shows that Scott's conservatism was both less Utopian and more radical than it has seemed to previous critics.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1911-0243
Print ISSN
0840-6286
Pages
pp. 631-656
Launched on MUSE
2010-06-30
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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