Abstract

The development of the deaf community in the mid-nineteenth century was intimately linked to schooling. Although a matrix of variables contributed, a major factor underlying the community's enduring strength was the alienation suffered by deaf persons in society. To counter this alienation, proposals emerged throughout the nineteenth century for the formation of a separate deaf state. The most significant of these was the plan of Flournoy in the late 1850s.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-0375
Print ISSN
0002-726X
Pages
pp. 363-367
Launched on MUSE
2012-07-11
Open Access
No
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