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  • Contributors to This Issue

Since completing an independent post-doctorate on gender, gesture, and ritual in the Middle East, Rob Baum has lived, worked and taught internationally. Bringing together her passion for interdisciplinary research, community bridging, arts activism, and African dance theatre, Rob recently assumed directorship of the new Gordon Institute for Performing and Creative Arts at University of Cape Town, South Africa. The author of a feminist phenomemenology of theatre (Female Absence: Women, Theatre and Other Metaphors), articles on Holocaust trauma, critical race theory and gender studies, and award-winning plays and poetry, Rob is completing a manuscript on Jewish identity and the Shoah. She has performed in dance, theatre, movement improvisation, and circus, directed theatre for people with mixed disabilities, and worked as a professional dance/movement therapist in diverse clinical populations.

Jodi Eichler-Levine is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh, where she teaches courses on Judaism and gender studies. Her work, which examines a wide range of public narratives in the American religious landscape, has also appeared in American Quarterly. She is currently writing a book on memory, violence, and identity in religious children's literature.

Sara Henkin is a writer living in London. She has degrees in American Studies from Mount Holyoke College and in Journalism from New York University.

David C. Jacobson is Professor of Judaic Studies at Brown University. He is author of Modern Midrash: The Retelling of Traditional Jewish Narratives by Twentieth-Century Hebrew Writers (State University of New York Press, 1987); Does David Still Play Before You? Israeli Poetry and the Bible (Wayne State University Press, 1997); Creator, Are You Listening? Israeli Poets on God and Prayer (Indiana University Press, 2007); and the forthcoming Beyond Political Messianism: The Poetry of Second Generation Religious Zionist Setters (Academic Studies Press). He is co-editor (with Kamal Abdel-Malek) of [End Page vii] Israeli and Palestinian Identities in History and Literature (St. Martin's Press, 1999). He is also co-editor (with William Cutter) of History and Literature: New Readings of Jewish Texts in Honor of Arnold J. Band (Brown Judaic Studies, 2002).

Rabbi Mois Navon is a computer design engineer by profession, but studied film critique as part of obtaining a minor in Art History from UCLA as well as at the Maale School of Television, Film and the Arts. He is a member of the Ptil Tekhelet Association, lecturing extensively on the topic of tekhelet. Mois has published numerous articles on Jewish thought in The Torah u-Madda Journal, Jewish Thought, Jewish Bible Quarterly, and Alei Etzion, B'Or Ha'Torah and Chidushei Torah. He maintains an outreach class on Jewish thought, and gives talks in parshanut. His writings can be accessed at www.divreinavon.com.

Laurence Roth is Professor of English and Jewish Studies and Director of the Jewish Studies Program at Susquehanna University. He is the author of Inspecting Jews: American Jewish Detective Stories (Rutgers University Press) and numerous essays on American Jewish popular literature. He is also editor of Modern Language Studies, the scholarly journal of the Northeast Modern Language Association, and is currently co-editing, with Nadia Valman, The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Jewish Cultures.

Carol Salus is Associate Professor of Art History at Kent State University. She is co-editor of Out of Context: American Artists Abroad (Greenwood, 2004), has published articles in a variety of journals, and was a National Endowment for the Humanities scholar in 2009. [End Page viii]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-5165
Print ISSN
0882-8539
Pages
pp. vii-viii
Launched on MUSE
2010-06-24
Open Access
No
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