Abstract

The contention of this article is that there has been a major oversight in the critical literature on the representations of the male body in Gerard Hopkins's poems. We have not seen that the men and the boys in these poems are subject to a rule of silence: they must not speak; or, if they do speak, they must be silenced. This article not only substantiates this contention, but reads the silence of the male body within its explicatory contexts: not only theological, but also political and sexual. Yet the article also argues that the privileged theological context of this silence is contradictory in questions that are central to Hopkins's thought.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 447-476
Launched on MUSE
2010-06-06
Open Access
No
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