Abstract

This article stresses the collaborative circumstances of Lavinia's production in order to identify the character's particular disruptive and creative agency within Titus Andronicus. Lavinia functions as a coauthor, intervening in and utilizing Rome's abundant tales. Shakespeare's character does not reiterate the Lucretian stories of suicide and sacrifice that fill the play. Rape does not abject her, but rather forcibly removes her from Titus's tale of purity. Through her survival, Lavinia makes the collapsing narrative strategies of the Andronici and the Goths impossible to ignore. She serves to incorporate others in a collaborative tale that highlights the play's inherently hybrid narratives.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 281-300
Launched on MUSE
2010-05-27
Open Access
No
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