Abstract

The Netherlands had not transferred West New Guinea (West Irian/West Papua) when it recognized Indonesia's independence in 1949 and Indonesia subsequently campaigned to secure it. When it armed itself to deal with domestic opposition in the late 1950s, it shifted the military balance with the Netherlands in its favour. Britain was apprehensive that war would result, which would threaten its interests in Southeast Asia. The Federation of Malaya, which became independent in 1957, was also anxious over its future security, given Indonesia's geographical position and growing power. The Prime Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman, sought to mediate between the Netherlands and Indonesia. The crisis also prompted him to advance the concept of Malaysia.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2180-4338
Print ISSN
0128-5483
Pages
pp. 77-90
Launched on MUSE
2010-09-09
Open Access
No
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