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  • Information about Contributors

Nishelle Y. Bellinger recently received her B.A. in women's studies and sociology at California State University San Marcos. Her work focuses on symbolic expression in social movements and issues of inequality.

David Evans is Professor of Music at the University of Memphis. He received his Ph.D. in folklore and mythology from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1976. Since 1964, he has conducted research on blues and other topics in African American folk music and folklore, and he is the author of Tommy Johnson, Big Road Blues: Tradition and Creativity in the Folk Blues, "The Coon in the Box": A Global Folktale in African-American Tradition (with John Minton), and The NPR Curious Listener's Guide to Blues, as well as many articles, book chapters, encyclopedia entries, and record annotations. His Big Road Blues received the Chicago Folklore Prize, and in 2003 he was given a Grammy Award for "Best Album Notes" for Screamin' and Hollerin' the Blues: The Worlds of Charley Patton. Evans is editor of the American Made Music book series for the University Press of Mississippi and was editor of Rounder Records's Deep River of Song CD series, which presented the field recordings of Alan Lomax. Evans has produced over fifty LPs and CDs of his field and studio recordings. He has also performed blues and folk music in many concerts and festivals, recorded two CDs, and made over thirty concert and lecture tours in Europe and South America.

Gary Alan Fine is John Evans Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in social psychology with a minor in folklore and mythology. He is the author of Manufacturing Tales: Sex and Money in Contemporary Legends and, with Patricia Turner, Whispers on the Color Line: Rumor and Race in America. His forthcoming book, co-authored with William C. Ellis, is titled Whispers on the Border Line: Rumor and Global Politics. He has also published on childlore and foodways.

John Holmes McDowell is a Professor in the Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology at Indiana University, where he also directs the Minority Languages and Cultures of Latin America Program, supervises the Folklore Archives, and edits the Journal of Folklore Research Reviews. His ethnographic research is primarily situated in Mexico and the Andes of Colombia and Ecuador, where he attends to traditional and emerging expressive forms as they engage processes of play, commemoration, and folklorization. [End Page 246]

Barry O'Neill is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Los Angeles. He graduated from the Mathematical Psychology Program at the University of Michigan and has taught at York University, Northwestern University, Yale University, and Stanford University. He uses the theory of games to study conflict resolution, negotiation, and fairness. His book Honor, Symbols, and War received the Woodrow Wilson Award as the year's best work in political science. Currently on leave from UCLA as the Leon Levy Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, he is engaged in research on prestige as a motive for states acquiring nuclear weapons.

Linda Pershing is Associate Professor of Women's Studies at California State University San Marcos. Her research focuses on feminist theory and folk expressions of resistance to systems of oppression based on gender, race, class, sexuality, and nationalism. She is the author of The Ribbon around the Pentagon: Peace by Piecemakers, which received the 1997 Elli Köngäs-Maranda Prize from the American Folklore Society, and Sew to Speak: The Fabric Art of Mary Milne. She is also the co-editor of Feminist Theory and the Study of Folklore, which received the 1994 Elli Köngäs-Maranda Prize. Pershing has devoted the past two years to fieldwork and research about the contemporary peace movement. [End Page 247]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1535-1882
Print ISSN
0021-8715
Pages
pp. 246-247
Launched on MUSE
2010-04-11
Open Access
No
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