Abstract

This article situates Elizabeth Gaskell's Wives and Daughters, serialized in Cornhill Magazine between 1864 and 1866, in the context of contemporary periodical articles that represent natural history as a moral endeavor and that depict men of science as moral exemplars. Gaskell thematizes scientific morality through her naturalist-hero Roger Hamley, linking his personal excellence to his scientific gifts and thus presenting scientific ways of thinking as relevant to the "every-day" world the novel chronicles and as integral to the development of the novel's courtship plot. The article ends by briefly considering the changing place of natural history in George Eliot's oeuvre.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1712-526X
Print ISSN
0709-4698
Pages
pp. 1-18
Launched on MUSE
2010-04-09
Open Access
No
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