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Contributors DANIEL L MANHEIM . . . is Professor of English and Chair of the English program at Centre College. The courses he teaches include nineteenthand twentieth-century U.S. literature, as well as African American literature, American autobiography, transcendentalism, literature of the Depression, and the modern short story. His previous publications include work on Henry Adams and Emily Dickinson, and he is currently doing further work on the early part of Dickinson's career and on the politics of poetic imagery in the writing of Thoreau. SIOBHAN PHILLIPS . . . is a graduate student at Yale University. She is working on a dissertation about quotidian time in twentieth-century American poetry. SANDRA RUNZO . . . Associate Professor of English, teaches courses in American literature and women's studies at Denison University in Granville, Ohio. Some of her essays have appeared in American Literature, the Emily Dickinson Journal, Genders, and Women's Studies. She serves on the editorial collective of Feminist Teacher and is coeditor of The Feminin Teacher Anthology: Pedagogies and Classroom Strategies. The essay featured here is part of a larger project that studies the poetry of Emily Dickinson within a context of nineteenth-century popular culture . JIM VON DER HEYDT. . . is the author of the forthcoming critical book The Brink of Infinity: Emersonian Poets on the Inadequate Continent (Dickinson, Frost, Bishop, Merrill). After completing his doctorate at Harvard in 2003, Dr. von der Heydt served three years as Allston Burr Senior Tutor in Harvard College's John Winthrop House and Lecturer in the Department of History and Literature. He is now Instructor of English at Phillips Exeter Academy. ...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1935-021X
Print ISSN
0093-8297
Pages
pp. 340-341
Launched on MUSE
2010-10-13
Open Access
No
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