Abstract

John Milton's 1649 prose tract Eikonoklastes aimed to undermine the popular image of Charles I as portrayed in Eikon Basilike, the document professing to be a record of the king's final meditations in prison. This essay argues that Milton revitalizes the ideology of iconoclasm by appropriating the logic and rhetoric of counterfeiting and posits a different economy of authority. When read in light of economic and numismatic discourses of early modem England, Milton can be seen to make a sweeping critique of representational authority that extends beyond the executed king and rewrites the economics of political authority.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1522-9270
Print ISSN
0039-3657
Pages
pp. 147-174
Launched on MUSE
2010-02-24
Open Access
No
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