Abstract

Through readings of his essays "The British Soldier" and "The Long Wards" and his short story "Owen Wingrave," this paper argues that James sought, through the figure of the non-combatant British soldier, to gauge the relation of the aesthetic, feminized observer to a militaristic and nationalist masculinity that always allured and perplexed him. James's vexed approach hinges on insistent returns to the British soldier and the standing army as "ornamental" figures. James's "ornamental" pleasure places the British soldier as the unstable locus for contesting moments of nationalist militarism, subversive eroticized play, and self-reflexive re-imaginings of the artist's relation to violence.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 32-38
Launched on MUSE
2010-02-20
Open Access
No
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