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  • Contributors

Mary Louise Buley-Meissner is an associate professor of English, regularly teaches courses in Hmong American literature and life stories at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Her teaching and research focus on women's life stories across cultures. Her community service includes Hmong National Development board membership. With Vincent K. Her, she is co-editing an essay collection titled Choosing To Be Hmong and American: Re-envisioning Identity, Community and Culture in Modern Society.

Aaron Castelán Cargile is a professor of communication studies at California State University, Long Beach. His research focuses on language attitudes and the pedagogy of race and has most recently appeared in the Journal of International and Intercultural Communication and the International Encyclopedia of Communication.

Susan Hardwick is a professor of geography at the University of Oregon. Her research focuses on immigrant communities in North American cities. She is the author or co-author of nine books and numerous journal articles and book chapters. Her most recent book was published by The Brookings Institution in 2008.

Vincent K. Her is an assistant professor at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, teaches courses on ethnic and racial minorities, anthropology, and Hmong American history and culture. As a member of the "1.5 generation," he has witnessed and researched the complex changes that Hmong Americans have experienced in making the transition from being refugees to becoming U.S. citizens.

Russell Jeung is an associate professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco State University. He is the author of Faithful Generations: Race and New Asian American Churches (Rutgers University Press, 2004) and other articles on Asian American religions. [End Page 123]

Taeku Lee is a professor of political science and law at the University of California at Berkeley. He has written and co-edited numerous books on racial and ethnic politics, public opinion, and the politics of immigration. Lee is also a co-PI of the 2008 National Asian American Survey.

Eriko Maeda is assistant professor of communication studies at California State University, Long Beach. Her research focuses on the intersection of culture, identity, and interpersonal relationships.

Keith Quincy is the former chairman of the Government program at East Washington University. Trained in philosophy, political science, and economics, his books span many disciplines. His most recent books are Plato Unmasked (2005) and Der: A True Story (2007). He has just finished a book on the economy that will be available in early 2010.

José I. Rodríguez is a professor of communication studies at California State University, Long Beach. His research appears in Text & Performance Quarterly, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, The Western Journal of Black Studies, and Communication Activism: Communication for Social Change.

Marc D. Rich is an associate professor of communication studies/performance studies at California State University, Long Beach. His research interests include performance and social change and critical race theory. His performance troupe, interACT, produces sociopolitical shows throughout the U.S.

Jolie Alexandra Sheffer is an assistant professor of English and an affiliated faculty member of American Culture Studies at Bowling Green State University. Her research focuses on multiethnic American literature, popular culture, and national identity in the long twentieth century.

Linta Varghese is a visiting assistant professor of anthropology at Vassar College. Her work focuses on new subjectivities in the South Asian Disapora in the United States. She is currently working on a manuscript examining neoliberalsim and the emergence of "workers" and "entrepreneurs" in South Asian community formation in New York City.

Philip Q. Yang is a professor of sociology at Texas Woman's University. He is the author or editor of three books and numerous articles on immigration, racial and ethnic studies, Asian Americans/immigrants, Chinese Americans/immigrants, citizenship acquisition, and transnationalism. He just completed a book manuscript Asian immigration to the United States contracted with Polity Press. [End Page 124]

Linta Varghese is a visiting assistant professor in the Anthropology Department at Vassar College. Her work focuses on new subjectivities in the South Asian Disapora in the United States. She is currently working on a manuscript examining neoliberalsim and the emergence of "workers" and "entrepreneurs" in South Asian community formation in New York City. [End Page 125]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1096-8598
Print ISSN
1097-2129
Pages
pp. 123-125
Launched on MUSE
2010-02-28
Open Access
No
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