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deal about getting a few fundamental facts straight, like texts, dates of composition and publication, illustrative quotations J_n context, and so on. 5· Subscription Renewals; We shall be pleased to accept subscription renewals between now and the early months of 1352. Our first reminders will go out with this number; the second reminder wi11 be mailed with the next number of this year; and the last reminder will be mailed with the first number of EFT to be published in 1S¿2„ Again subscriptions for 1962 will be one dollar; single copies and all back numbers (including those published in 1961) will be fifty cents for each item. We shall once more follow our usual policy of mailing the first number of Volume 5 (1962) to all subscribers whose subscriptions have lapsed; thereafter we cannot continue a subscription unless it is renewed. Many of our subscribers have paid for subscriptions for one to three years in advance—we appreciate this, for it saves us much time and it helps us keep the cost of EFT down to our present low rates. Will you not, therefore, consider subscribing for 1962.and. perhaps, I963? ANNOUNCEMENTS 1. Purdue University Studies: The business address of this series of monographs is 308 State Street, West Lafayette, Indiana. The first item published in this series is Richard J. Voorhees' THE PARADOX OF GEORGE ORWELL (paperbound, $1.95). 2. The Second Monograph: HAMLET: A TRAGEDY OF ERRORS (paperbound, $1.75) by Weston Babcock is the second in the series of Purdue University Studies. Like the first in this series, Professor Babcock's study of HAMLET has the rare qualities of clarity and readability, and it is the result of years of teaching and reflection of an independent mind. The author has not attempted to delve deep into the causes or the nature of Hamlet's disturbance (but then everyone else has). Babcock says, "Accepting the belief that the Prince was melancholic, in the Elizabethan sense of the word, 1 have tried to discover how that melancholy affected the plot, the dramaturgy." He cites Timothy Bright's statement that melancholia was easily made suspicion and argues that "suspicion leads to suspicion, and to efforts to discover the truth—the very elements of plot and counterplot." "False suspicion," Babcock continues, "leads to misconceptions, which, in turn, lead to errors. In the hands of the master dramatist, these elements result in a fascinating interweaving of ironies; and so seen, HAMLET becomes much more than a study of the Prince. It becomes Shakespeare's most complete study of the consequences of human error." Professor Babcock's book becomes a refreshing study of the play as a play, 3. THE GRADUATE STUDENT OF EMGLISH: Regrettably, this publication ceased with Volume 3 (I960). During its short life, this journal was a thoroughly fresh breeze in academic publishing. k. MODERN LANGUAGE NOTES: This journal announces that it "plans to concentrate exclusively on literature other than American and English beginning January 1962. 5. Persons: David D. Harvey, formerly of Vassar College, and most recently on a research spree (bibliography of Ford Madox Ford) in England, has returned to the United States. James G. Hepburn, formerly of Cornell University and now (Sept 1961) at the University of Rhode Island, has co-edited, with Robert A. Greenberg, an interesting casebook ROBERT FROST: AN INTRODUCTION (NY: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1961). Professor Hepburn's THE ART OF ARMOLD BENNETT, an excellent critical study, will be published by University of Indiana Press. We shall publish in a forthcoming issue of EFT Hepburn's "Manuscript Notes for LORD RAINGO," a short, but, we think, important article on Bennett's novel. Charles E. Linck (East Texas State College) will be in England in February 1961 Ann Weygandt (University of Delaware), who has contributed so much to our Kipling bibliography, has spent the summer in England and on the Continent. ...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1559-2715
Print ISSN
0013-8339
Pages
pp. v-vi
Launched on MUSE
2010-05-21
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Will Be Archived 2021
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