Abstract

Although prerevolutionary politicians worried about radicalized colonial readers, postrevolutionary historians often treated reading and printing as effects rather than as causes of the American Revolution. This essay reconsiders relations of print to politics by focusing on political reprinting and by examining the production and consumption of a cheap pamphlet of Locke's Second Treatise issued by Boston printers in 1773. Rather than asking if books make revolutions (or which books), scholars should balance the best-selling pamphlets against the worst, should consider the role of prerevolutionary tracts during and after Independence, and should attend more closely to the marketing of revolution.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1559-0895
Print ISSN
1543-4273
Pages
pp. 5-40
Launched on MUSE
2010-01-16
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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