Abstract

Living in a city subjected to aerial bombardment is an experience dominated by the aural rather than the visual sense: bombs are heard, not seen. Accordingly, much of the writing about the London Blitz relies on the imagery of blindness. There is, however, a notable exception. Henry Green's 1943 novel, Caught, presents a picture of London during the Blitz that overflows with intense colors. The colors, which do not inhere in any of the objects Green describes, are to be understood as a quasi-synaesthetic response to the sounds of bombing. This response is attributable to Green's progressive deafness.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 102-116
Launched on MUSE
2010-01-14
Open Access
No
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