Abstract

This article examines the secularization thesis of Iran’s faqih-headed revolutionary Islamic state, as put forward by Sa’id Hajjarian (1954–), against the institutional and political developments in the post-Khomeini period. His thesis posited that the religious state in postrevolutionary Iran, with its official doctrine of the absolute mandate of the jurisprudent, serves as the most important accelerator in the two-part process of secularization of the traditional institutions and jurisprudence of Shiism as well as of the faqih-headed Islamic state. The article finds that the developments in the post-Khomeini period have generally confirmed the logic and insights of Hajjarian’s thesis and suggests that the secularizing trends will likely continue as long as this particular state is in place.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-226X
Print ISSN
1089-201X
Pages
pp. 468-482
Launched on MUSE
2009-12-06
Open Access
No
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