• Washington Place:Harboring American Claims, Housing Hawaiian Culture
Figure 2. In February 1893, John L. Stevens wrote in his despatch to the U.S. State department that "there was no military force in the islands but the royal guard of about 75 natives, not in effective force equal to 20 American soldiers. These were promptly discharged by the Provisional Government, except 16 left as the guard of the fallen Queen at her house." John L. Stevens, United States Legation, Honolulu, February 1, 1893, Despatch 84, copy in Blount Report, 403–4. Pictured here are the "fallen Queen's house," Washington Place, and the guard of sixteen, plus their captain. Photograph by Hedemann, 1891–93. Courtesy of the Bishop Museum.
Figure 2.

In February 1893, John L. Stevens wrote in his despatch to the U.S. State department that "there was no military force in the islands but the royal guard of about 75 natives, not in effective force equal to 20 American soldiers. These were promptly discharged by the Provisional Government, except 16 left as the guard of the fallen Queen at her house." John L. Stevens, United States Legation, Honolulu, February 1, 1893, Despatch 84, copy in Blount Report, 403–4. Pictured here are the "fallen Queen's house," Washington Place, and the guard of sixteen, plus their captain. Photograph by Hedemann, 1891–93. Courtesy of the Bishop Museum.

Additional Information

ISSN
1934-6832
Print ISSN
1936-0886
Pages
48-72
Launched on MUSE
2009-12-06
Open Access
No
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