Abstract

The writings of John Chrysostom contain many references to excrement and other kinds of refuse. This study collates the information he offers on urban sanitation and examines his rhetorical use of the language of filth. This aversive language occurs primarily not in his fulminations against Jews or Jewish-Christian interaction, but in his attacks on traditional Greco-Roman practices. He mobilizes disgust in order to deter his congregation from pursuing or admiring elite behaviors. Defilement is for him a moral category, but the power of his rhetoric springs directly from the brutal facts of urban waste that he details.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1942-1273
Print ISSN
1939-6716
Pages
pp. 337-356
Launched on MUSE
2009-11-05
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.