Abstract

The common affectional interchange between infants and adults, colloquially called "baby talk," is important to the normal emotional, intellectual, psychosocial, and linguistic development of infants. It also is the source, I suggest, of the aesthetic imagination, which arises developmentally from such features of interactivity as temporal coordination of emotional behavior; crossmodal and supramodal neural processing; and mutually-influenced, playful use of ritualized affiliative signals. Similarities between the developmental course in infants of imitation and pretense and the ways the arts present imaginative representations to mature adults argue not only for the deep-rootedness of our aesthetic nature but for the fundamental importance of intersubjective and affective dimensions of the adapted mind.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2095
Print ISSN
0049-2426
Pages
pp. 85-103
Launched on MUSE
2001-01-01
Open Access
No
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