Abstract

This article explores the emergent post-Katrina tourism narrative and its ambivalent racialization of the city. Tourism officials are compelled to acknowledge a New Orleans outside the traditional tourist boundaries – primarily black, often poor, and still largely neglected by the city and national governments. On the other hand, tourism promoters do not relinquish (and do not allow tourists to relinquish) the myths of racial exoticism and white supremacist desire for a construction of blacks as artistically talented but socially inferior.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6490
Print ISSN
0003-0678
Pages
pp. 749-768
Launched on MUSE
2009-09-23
Open Access
No
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