Abstract

Egypt in all its guises—biblical, ancient, and modern—was a place of uncanny "otherness" in Freud's visual and historical imagination. This mental construct was formed from both hieroglyphic writing and Freud's collection of small-scale statuary. Uncanny visual representations of Egypt were also found in books and photographs in his archaeological library, as well as in wood engravings in the Philippson Bible, which he encountered for the first time in early childhood. Manifest subject matter associated with Egypt included mummies, dancing-girls, works of ancient art, and romantic desert landscapes. The present reflections on Freud's multifaceted fascination with Egypt are offered as prolegomena to open prospects for further research.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1085-7931
Print ISSN
0065-860X
Pages
pp. 185-210
Launched on MUSE
2009-08-07
Open Access
No
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