Abstract

As a child in Ottumwa, Iowa, Edna Ferber was taunted for being Jewish; as a young woman eager to launch her career as a journalist, she was told that the Chicago Tribune did not hire women reporters. Despite her experience of antisemitism and sexism, she idealized America, creating in her novels an American myth where strong women and downtrodden men of any race prevail. This article focuses on two of her best-selling novels, Show Boat (1926) and Cimarron (1930), which create visions of racial harmony and female strength in a fictional world that purported to be America but was more illusion than reality. Characters in Ferber's novels achieve assimilation and acceptance that was periodically denied Ferber herself throughout her life.

Additional Information

ISSN
1534-5165
Print ISSN
0882-8539
Pages
pp. 52-60
Launched on MUSE
2001-12-01
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.