Abstract

During the 1990s Botswana broadcasting underwent major, politically significant changes which will soon enable it to play a greater role in the democratization of politics and society. External and domestic influences on the government's decision to abandon its broadcasting monopoly are examined. The politics of broadcast deregulation and reform are analyzed. Special attention is devoted to processes leading to the introduction of commercial broadcasting and a national television service. It is argued that for media to play democracy-nurturing roles, workers must be empowered with adequate resources, training, experience, and professionalism.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1978
Print ISSN
0001-9887
Pages
pp. 87-102
Launched on MUSE
2000-02-01
Open Access
No
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