Abstract

Modern Hebrew poetry about Tel Aviv has inevitably been influenced by images of those European urban centers that were the native landscapes of many of its writers. This essay examines the evolution of this memory of the European landscape in a selection of poems, focusing on the figues of Leah Goldberg and Meir Weiseltier, and drawing further examples from the work of S. Y. Agnon, Avraham Shlonsky, Nathan Alterman, and Dalia Hertz. I argue that the perception of Tel Aviv as a place with neither memory nor history has served as a powerful tool of poetic self-expression, and has thereby enabled poetry to explore the fundamental issues of territory, space, and exile in Israeli culture.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3311
Print ISSN
0272-9601
Pages
pp. 350-378
Launched on MUSE
2001-09-01
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.