publisher colophon
Contributors' Column - American Speech 76:2 American Speech 76.2 (2001) iv

Contributors' Column

Marvin K. L. Ching is professor emeritus at the University of Memphis. He was editor of The SECOL Journal for Summer 1975-Spring 1999. He has published articles on the question of intonation in Southern English, the semantics of fixin' to, the pragmatic use of Southern ma'am and sir, and the relation between identity and the maintenance of the native tongue of second-generation Chinese children of faculty at the University of Memphis.

Rachelle Waksler is professor of linguistics and head of the Linguistics Program at San Francisco State University. Her research focus is the organization and representation of the mental lexicon, bridging theoretical linguistics and experimental psycholinguistics. She has published articles in the areas of speech processing, speech production, phonology, morphology, syntax, discourse, Native American linguistics, language and gender, and language and sexual orientation.

Allison Burkette is currently a doctoral candidate at the University of Georgia. Her research interests are language variation and change, social network theory, and Appalachian English.

Thomas E. Nunnally is associate professor of English at Auburn University, where he teaches linguistics (and core-curriculum English courses) and conducts research in sociohistorical change. He co-organized the second Language Variety in the South conference (LAVIS-II), held at Auburn in 1993, and has recently served as president of the Southeastern Conference on Linguistics (SECOL). In 2001-2 he will teach linguistics and do research on world Englishes at Sofia University and Veliko Turnovo University in Bulgaria as a Fulbright professor.



Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2133
Print ISSN
0003-1283
Pages
4
Launched on MUSE
2001-06-01
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2005
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.