In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Selected Letters from Readers
  • Paul Freedman, Jon Trejo, Scott Morris, Finley, Issa Boulos, Kyra D. Gaunt, Renee Coulombe, Jeffrey Norman, Brad Neuberg, Jack McHale, Chad Finsterwald, Mike Johnson, and Bill Costley

PMC Reader’s Report on PMC 6.2

Like every other issue.

People act before they think.

the history of acrylic can be told in terms other than analysis:

polymerization of substance is not a fictive lacquer but an immanent

rechaining of actual potential.

see the movie stalingrad.

war indeed.

Paul Freedman
pfreedma@osf1.gmu.edu

First of five letters on this topic.

PMC Reader’s Report on Nice Job

This page has been VERY helpful in my 11th grade English research paper, and i just wanted to thank the builder of this site. It’s is hard to find text referances these days. You did a great job and i probably used this source more than any of my others...

Jon Trejo
nebula@prairienet.org

Second of five letters on this topic

PMC Reader’s Report on critique

Perhaps this imminent frenzy of critical post-production will calm the peripheral aesthetics, where subject remains pure. To the extent that modern creation depends on the eclipse of the real by images, cultural critics would seem especially qualified to analyze it. Elaine Scarry: “it is when art has become to its makers a fiction that critique begins.” If this is the case, if self-esteem arises from an investment in certain fictions, then critics of fiction ought to be able to rule over each of our bodies — and establish the moral and political gravity of their own. What is at issue here are analyses of self and analogies of it. We will burrow into the histories of critique because we will see, or at least want to see, criticism itself as a form of creation. We will project an image of ourselves onto a field of study and recognize our reflection in it. Critics of creation already manipulate the Self of their discourse in order both to attack their violent egoism and to conceive the struggle itself along imaginary lines. Vast energies will be expended not only on the histories and rhetoric of the creation of the Self, but on the mechanism of rhetoric and critical inquiry, on the “violence” of the intellect, on the “mobile army of metaphors, metonyms, and anthropomorphisms” that, for Nietzsche, make up what is called truth.

Scott Morris
sm92+@andrew.cmu.edu

Third of five letters on this topic.

PMC Reader’s Report on Postmodern Culture

Dear Mr. Unsworth:

Just cruising this morning in my favorite area of interest which could be broadly defined as cultural/critical theory and came upon your paper about your efforts at PMC. What I would like to tell you is that although I am a long time home pc dabbler your journal was the primary reason I finally gained access to the internet. I came across some files from it that had been uploaded to a bulletin board (Temple of the Screaming Electron) in california. They fell like manna into a relatively parched, but beautiful, rural environment in which I live. When I finally realized that your magnificent journal was only accessible online I signed up with my local service provider.

I’m a union teamster living in rural Vermont so I don’t have a lot of access to the sort of stuff you have in your journal and you provide access to from your website. Our local library is swell, computerized too, but a computer search under postmodernism or poststructuralism or Derrida or Baudrillard or Jameson produces zero hits.

Thank you.

Finley

Fourth of five letters on this topic.

PMC Reader’s Report on Just trying to create communication:

I just wanted you to know that I really appreciate what you are doing.

It would an honor if you keep in touch, or send your messages, and what’s new.

By the way, this is my first time on the Net, so do you know how postmodern issues are touching Music? I mean, for me, I am trying to apply my ways and senses over the music that I am composing, and I have to say, the...

Additional Information

ISSN
1053-1920
Launched on MUSE
1996-01-05
Open Access
No
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