Abstract

William De Brahm first rose to prominence in the 1750s as a scientific cartographer in southeastern North America. By the 1790s, he had become a mystical prophet, using his religious works as a means to criticize the imperialist tendencies of the century. Studying his written geographical work reveals a surprising continuity between these two careers. Understanding this continuity also helps to shed new light on the relationship between imperialism, science, cartography, and religion.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 481-499
Launched on MUSE
2009-07-11
Open Access
No
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