Abstract

As biomedicine turns increasingly toward chronic diseases, compliance or adherence with pharmaceutical regimens has become a major focus. This article explores the specters created by the diagnostics of non-compliance, focusing on asthma in the eastern Caribbean country of Barbados. I argue that the rubric of compliance in biomedicine today medicalizes "culture" as a gendered irrational use of medications; and such a focus has created a counterdiscourse among families and medical practitioners that posits a biomedicine obsessed with "compliance." I suggest that these reciprocal reactions comprise a medical schismogenics that exceed the diagnostics of noncompliance, whether biomedical or anthropological.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-1518
Print ISSN
0003-5491
Pages
pp. 447-475
Launched on MUSE
2009-06-26
Open Access
No
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