Abstract

Recent anthropological analysis of non-industrial textile manufacture in Central Asia reveals a tradition of mnemonic devices, recalled in the form of songs, that are used to reproduce patterns in various forms of textiles. Evidence from a range of texts suggests that a similar practice was used by weavers throughout the Greek archaic and classical periods to render complex designs in cloth. Several passages in Euripides' Ion suggest that, in the Greek sphere, these mnemonic devices sometimes took the form of mythological narratives, perhaps even related to the manufacture of cloth representing the very stories used to encode their forms.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6504
Print ISSN
0004-0975
Pages
pp. 151-159
Launched on MUSE
2009-05-08
Open Access
No
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