Abstract

Settlement in Greece was not a uniform experience for the approximately one million Ottoman Greeks who fled Turkey in the aftermath of the Greco-Turkish war of 1920–1922. Contemporary primary sources ranging from government reports to eyewitness accounts and memoirs of relief workers point to a mixed reality: while some Ottoman Greek refugees enjoyed hospitality and warm support upon arrival in Greece, many others found settlement in the new country a painful experience of material hardship, segregation, and status deprivation. The precarious circumstances of the massive exodus created the refugee drama. The inability of the Greek state to handle a crisis of such magnitude, along with serious incidents of refugee discrimination and exploitation by Greek officials and civilians, exacerbated the refugees' plight.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3265
Print ISSN
0738-1727
Pages
pp. 271-287
Launched on MUSE
2010-06-24
Open Access
No
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