In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Contributors

Sohrab Behdad is a professor and John E. Harris Chair in Economics at Denison University. With Farhad Nomani, he is the author of Class and Labor in Iran: Did the Revolution Matter? (Syracuse University Press, 2006), a recipient of the 2007 Association of Third World Studies book award, and the editor of Islam and the Everyday World: Public Policy Dilemmas (Routledge, 2006).He was a member of the faculty of economics of Tehran University from the early 1970s to the mid-1980s.

Michael Dodson is a professor of political science at Texas Christian University, where he teaches comparative politics and political theory. He has held two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and was a Fulbright Senior Lecturer in the United Kingdom. His recent research has been published in Human Rights Review, Latin American Research Review, Latin American Politics and Society, and Whitehead Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations.

Manochehr Dorraj is a professor of political science at Texas Christian University. He has published extensively on the politics and culture of the Middle East and the Muslim world. His publications include From Zarathustra to Khomeini: Populism and Dissent in Iran (Lynne Rienner, 1990), The Changing Political Economy of the Third World (Lynne Reiner, 1995), The Middle East at the Crossroads (University Press of America, 1999), and (coeditor with Mehran Kamrava) Iran Today: An Encyclopedia of Life in the Islamic Republic (Greenwood Press, 2008).

Jack A. Goldstone is the Hazel Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University. He has published Revolution and Rebellion in the Early Modern World (University of California Press, 1991) and is editor of The Encyclopedia of Political Revolutions (Congressional Quarterly, 1998). He is working on a new book, “Understanding Revolutions,” with John Foran and Eric Selbin, for Pine Forge Press.

Mansoor Moaddel is a professor of sociology at Eastern Michigan University and a research affiliate at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research Population Studies Center. He is interested in the causes and consequences of values and attitudes of the Middle Eastern and Islamic publics. His publications include the book Value and Perceptions of the Middle Eastern and Islamic Publics: Findings from Values Survey (Palgrave, 2007) and articles in Public Opinion Quarterly, International Journal of Middle East Studies, and Interdisciplinary Journal of Research on Religion.

Behrooz Moazami is an assistant professor of Middle Eastern history at Loyola University, New Orleans. He joined academia after being a political activist for more than two decades. His doctorates are in political science (European studies) and sociology and historical studies. He is the author of “The Ulema and the Nationalization of Religious Morality in Iran, 1925 – 63,” Critique: Critical Middle Eastern Studies (2008).

Haideh Moghissi is a professor of sociology and women’s studies at York University, Toronto. She was a founder of the Iranian National Union of Women and a member of its first executive and editorial boards, before leaving Iran in 1984. Her publications in English include journal articles; chapters in edited volumes, and the following books: Muslim Diaspora: Gender, Culture, and Identity (Routledge, 2006); Women and Islam: Critical Concepts in Sociology (Routledge, 2005); Feminism and Islamic Fundamentalism: The Limits of Postmodern Analysis (Zed Press, 1998); winner of Choice Outstanding Academic Book Award); and Populism and Feminism in Iran: Women’s Struggle in a Male-Defined Revolutionary Movement (Macmillan Press; St.Martin’s Press 1994).

Farhad Nomani is a professor of economics at the American University of Paris. With Sohrab Behdad, he is the author of Class and Labor in Iran: Did the Revolution Matter? (Syracuse University Press, 2006), a recipient of the 2007 Association of Third World Studies book award, and the editor of Islam and the Everyday World: Public Policy Dilemmas (Routledge, 2006). He was a member of the faculty of economics of Tehran University from the early 1970s to the mid-1980s. [End Page 152]

Misagh Parsa is a professor of sociology at Dartmouth College. A specialist on revolutions, he has published States, Ideologies, and Social Revolutions: A Comparative Analysis of Iran, Nicaragua, and the Philippines (Cambridge University Press, 2000) and Social Origins of the Iranian Revolution (Rutgers University Press, 1989), named an “important revisionist” work on the Iranian revolution...

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1548-226X
Print ISSN
1089-201X
Pages
pp. 152-153
Launched on MUSE
2009-04-02
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.