Abstract

The article focuses on a memoir, “My Experience in Cameroons during the War,” by J. G. Mullen, published in the Gold Coast Leader between 1916 and 1918. This memoir is unique for its status as a first-person narrative by an ordinary African clerk. Mullen’s narrative furnishes us with many insights into the educated, non-elite man’s imperial identity in the early twentieth century. Through it, we can discover precisely how a Ghanaian “native clerk” articulated his imperial subjectivity, his race-consciousness, his perception of social class in the colonies, his “patriotism,” and his need for existential (if not political) freedoms during the war.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2044
Print ISSN
0034-5210
Pages
pp. 1-15
Launched on MUSE
2009-04-16
Open Access
No
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