Abstract

Charles Perrault’s “Sleeping Beauty” does not end with a kiss, but with an ogress throwing herself into a vat of slimy creatures after a botched attempt at eating her family. Rather than account for the ogress story line through source study, this essay examines the narrative processes that connect the sleep plot and the ogress plot, demonstrating that substitution is the organizing principle of the tale. Reading the princess and the ogress as substitutes for each other elucidates the tale’s underlying anxiety: the woman who withdraws from the world, whether in sleep or appetite, is a danger to society and to narrative.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1536-1802
Print ISSN
1521-4281
Pages
pp. 259-276
Launched on MUSE
2009-04-08
Open Access
No
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