Abstract

This article discusses Shaykh Khalid Naqshbandi (1776–1827); his Sufi brotherhood, the Naqshbandiyya-Khalidiyya; and Muslim sainthood. It argues that social movement theory allows us to see the ongoing influence of sainthood in Muslim societies and that Khalid’s success rested on his ideological flexibility, appeal to multiple audiences, and emphasis on the hereafter. The article also observes that the Naqshbandiyya-Khalidiyya has addressed a desire in modern societies for a greater balance between spirituality and materialism. Finally, the similarities between the Naqshbandiyya-Khalidiyya, a Muslim organization, and contemporary Christian organizations raise questions about how we classify postmodern religious movements and track their development over time.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-8050
Print ISSN
1045-6007
Pages
pp. 521-545
Launched on MUSE
2009-01-16
Open Access
No
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