Abstract

This article enacts as psychoanalytic analysis of Neil Gaiman's junior novel Coraline and graphic novel The Mirror Mask in order to position these two highly regarded children's texts in the postfeminist landscape of contemporary western world patriarchy. The interpretation concatenates the stories of the two female protagonists of these novels, Coraline and Helena, as exemplars of maturational stages in identity formation that demonstrate the ways in which feminine roles are currently circumscribed.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1553-1201
Print ISSN
0885-0429
Pages
pp. 371-389
Launched on MUSE
2009-01-16
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.