Abstract

This article has as its prime focus not the theories of J. F. C. Fuller and B. H. Liddell Hart, but their zeal to reform the British Army, 1918–39. It explores the strengths and weaknesses they brought to the task, and seeks to relate their aims to broader intellectual currents, especially the notion of a "conflict of generations" that the experience on the Western Front of the First World War heightened. The latter reached a peak of popularity in 1928–33. The article thus seeks to assess Fuller and Liddell Hart's motives and aspirations in the light of a shared passionate desire not to sacrifice their intellectual freedom as critics.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-7795
Print ISSN
0899-3718
Pages
pp. 147-175
Launched on MUSE
2009-01-15
Open Access
No
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