Abstract

This paper considers questions raised by two historically coincident treatments of the Danaids: one in the narrative sequence central to Horace’s Odes 3.11, another the deployment of Danaus’ fifty daughters as intercolumnar ornaments surrounding the Palatine Temple of Apollo and represented by the three archaizing female herm-figures in nero antico now displayed in the Palatine Antiquarium. Although not, as popularly believed, shown actively murdering their husbands, their grimly regimented appearance adumbrates punishment as water-bearers. Yet Horace’s Hypermestra, left complaining of her own punishment for “pious impietas,” fares little better. Uneasy co-optation links paternal authority with political propaganda.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1558-9234
Print ISSN
0009-8418
Pages
pp. 13-32
Launched on MUSE
2008-12-06
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.