Abstract

The literary tradition documents a fraught relationship between Athens and philosophers—a relationship dominated by, but scarcely confined to, the Athenians’ condemnation of Socrates. The historicity of much of this tradition has been questioned, and suspicion has fallen on Demetrius of Phalerum’s Apology of Socrates as a pivotal work within the supposed fabrication of this tradition. This article seeks to reassess the contribution of Demetrius’s Socrates to the anti-Athenian intellectual tradition, and to suggest that the work’s enduring significance resides rather in its contribution to Peripatetic historical investigation.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2575-7199
Print ISSN
2575-7180
Pages
pp. 393-410
Launched on MUSE
2008-12-05
Open Access
No
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