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  • Contributors

Victor D. Boantza is a doctoral candidate at Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology at the University of Toronto, where he is completing a dissertation on styles of experimental reasoning in early modern alchemy and chemistry. He has published several articles on the Chemical Revolution and seventeenth-century chemistry, and he is presently co-editing a volume on Controversies Within the Scientific Revolution..

Eric Gidal is Associate Professor of English at the University of Iowa. He is the author of Poetic Exhibitions: Romantic Aesthetics and the Pleasures of the British Museum (Bucknell UP, 2001) and articles on eighteenth-century and Romantic-period poetry, aesthetics, and visual culture.

Robert Markley is Professor of English and Romano Professorial Scholar at the University of Illinois. The editor of the interdisciplinary journal The Eighteenth Century: Theory and Interpretation, he is the author of numerous articles in eighteenth-century studies, science studies, and new media. His books include Two-Edg'd Weapons: Style and Ideology in the Comedies of Etherege, Wycherley, and Congreve (1988), Crises of Representation in Newtonian England, 1660–1740 (1993), Dying Planet: Mars in Science and the Imagination (2005), and The Far East and the English Imagination, 1600–1730 (2006).

Laura Miller is a PhD candidate in the Department of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her dissertation is entitled Narrating [End Page 151] Newton, Narrating Truth: Fame, Print, and Scientific Authorship. She also has an essay entitled "Transporting England: Pepys' Sea Ballads," together with an edited selection of sea ballads, forthcoming in Early Modern Broadside Ballads: From the Pepys Collection (Ed. Patricia Fumerton. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies).

Betty A. Schellenberg is Professor of English at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, Canada. Her publications include The Conversational Circle: Rereading the English Novel, 1740-1775 (1996) and The Professionalization of Women Writers in Eighteenth-Century Britain (2005). She is currently editing a volume of The Cambridge Edition of the Correspondence of Samuel Richardson and writing a book on mid-eighteenth-century literary cultures and media.

Alvin Snider teaches English at the University of Iowa and is editor of PQ (Philological Quarterly). He is presently completing a book, Nature's Dominion: Writing English Bodies, 1660–1685.

Rajani Sudan is Associate Professor of English at Southern Methodist University. She is the author of Fair Exotics: Xenophobic Subjects in English Literature, 1720–1850 (2002), and she is currently completing a book entitled Mud, Mortar, and Other Technologies of Empire.

Gillen D'Arcy Wood is Associate Professor of English at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of The Shock of the Real: Romanticism and Visual Culture, 1760–1860 (2001) and an eco-historical novel, Hosack's Folly (2005). This essay is drawn from his book-in-progress, The Invention of Weather: Climate, Culture, Politics, 1780–1850. [End Page 152]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-3786
Print ISSN
1531-0485
Pages
pp. 151-152
Launched on MUSE
2008-10-26
Open Access
No
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