Abstract

Though never a significant practice in statistical terms, sati (widow burning) played a pivotal role in British representations of India. While the East India Company negotiated its new role in India (1757–84), some writers and artists who had extensive personal experience in India (like John Zephaniah Holwell and Eyles Irwin) experimented with a non-judgmental stance. They tried to suspend their European beliefs and become disinterested observers of the sati ceremony, echoing the sentimental stance of the impartial spectator postulated in the moral philosophy of Adam Smith. However, this impartial stance never gained wide acceptance, and after the 1780s the British strongly objected to the custom on partial grounds.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-315X
Print ISSN
0013-2586
Pages
pp. 19-44
Launched on MUSE
2008-10-10
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.