Abstract

Empire building converges with print innovations in the rare Zaragoza edition (1523) of the landmark "Second Letter from Mexico" of Hernán Cortés. The Aragonese print shop owned by German immigrant George Coçi advertised what, to its first interpreters, was stunning news from a still mysterious place overseas with woodblocks drawn from their 1520 edition of Livy's History of Rome. An examination of the political, social, and editorial contexts that informed these two books addressed to Charles V casts light on concerns about how the new Spanish king would communicate with his subjects in an age of imperial expansion.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1935-0236
Print ISSN
0034-4338
Pages
pp. 711-749
Launched on MUSE
2008-10-03
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Archived 2009
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