In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • Contributors

Brenda Jo Brueggemann is Professor of English and Disability Studies at Ohio State University.

Suzanne Diamond is an Associate Professor at Youngstown State University; she is currently editing an essay collection on the politics of personal disclosure, and her teaching interests include writing, literature, film studies, and narrative theory.

Carra Leah Hood is an Assistant Professor of Writing at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. Her publications on trauma and other topics in rhetorical studies have appeared in Composition Forum, Nebula, Feminist Media Studies, and Media and Culture.

Andrew Jakubowicz is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Centre for Cosmopolitan Civil Societies at the University of Technology Sydney. His research focuses on cultural diversity in Australia and internationally, and in particular, on the impact of cultural diversity on public culture. His websites Making Multicultural Australia and The Menorah of Fang Bang Lu report this research.

Marlene Kadar is Professor of Humanities and Women's Studies at York University in Toronto. She publishes in the field of life writing studies with a focus on war and Holocaust themes, and their influence on the autobiographical genres. She is also the Editor of the Life Writing Series at Wilfrid Laurier University Press, Waterloo, Canada.

Carolyn Kraus teaches nonfiction narrative at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Her essays have appeared in The New York Times, The New Yorker, Partisan Review, Threepenny Review, and The Antioch Review. Her essay "On Hurting People's Feelings: Journalism, Guiilt, and Autobiography" appeared in Biography 26.2 (Spring 2003).

Phylis Cancilla Martinelli is Professor of Sociology at St. Mary's College of California. Her research interests are those who are First in their Family to attend college, and immigrants in the Southwest. She is a third generation Italian American. [End Page 366]

Mark McClelland lectures in Sociology at the University of Wollongong, Australia, and was the 2007/08 Toyota Visiting Professor of Japanese at the University of Michigan. He has published widely on sexual minority cultures in Japan and elsewhere, and is the author of Queer Japan from the Pacific War to the Internet Age (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005) and co-editor of Queer Voices from Japan: First-Person Narratives from Japan's Sexual Minorities (Lexington, 2007).

Armine Kotin Mortimer is Professor of French literature at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she has been department head since 2004. Her work on Doubrovsky has been published in Genre and in Les Temps Modernes. She has published extensively on the novels of Philippe Sollers.

Benjamin Nathans is the Ronald S. Lauder Endowed Term Associate Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania. His most recent book is Culture Front: Representing Jews in Eastern Europe (U of Pennsylvania P, 2008), co-edited with Gabriella Safran.

Duane A. Rudolph is Assistant Professor of French at the University of Hawai'i at Mänoa. His area of specialization is the French Renaissance.

Penny Van Toorn is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Sydney. She has published widely on writing by and about Indigenous people in Canada and Australia, and is the author of Writing Never Arrives Naked: Early Aboriginal Cultures of Writing in Australia (Aboriginal Studies Press, 2006).

Burton L. Visotzky is the Appleman Professor of Midrash and Interreligious Studies at the Jewish Theological Seminary in New York. He is the author, most recently, of A Delightful Compendium of Consolation: A Fabulous Tale of Romance, Adventure and Faith in the Medieval Mideast (Ben Yehuda Press, 2008).

Telford Work is Associate Professor of Theology at Westmont College. His most recent book is Ain't Too Proud to Beg: Living Through the Lord's Prayer (Eerdman's, 2007). [End Page 367]

...

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1456
Print ISSN
0162-4962
Pages
pp. 366-367
Launched on MUSE
2008-09-18
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.