Abstract

This essay focuses on the African story in Hemingway's novel The Garden of Eden as a way to explore issues of narrative authority. Instead of privileging the unpublished manuscripts, this essay provides an argument about the significance of the published novel's focus and plot, making clear who and what get sacrificed in the name of narrative closure. The hunt for narrative closure in the published novel parallels the hunt in the African story, ultimately leading to the death of the elephant and its figurative iterations in Catherine and in the characters' explorations of gender and sexuality. As such, the novel sheds light on the complex relations among biographical experience, textual construction, and interpretive practices.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4815
Print ISSN
0276-3362
Pages
pp. 96-117
Launched on MUSE
2008-07-18
Open Access
No
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