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  • Contributors

Ralph Bauer is an assistant professor in the Department of English at the University of Maryland, College Park. He has published articles in journals such as American Literature, Early American Literature, Colonial Latin American Review, Comparative Literature, atq, and esq, as well as in several collections of essays. He is currently working on a comparative study of colonial writing in early British and Spanish America and on a bilingual edition of Titu Cusi Yupanqui’s Relación de la Conquista del Perú/An Inca Account of the Conquest of Peru.

Jefferson Faye (Polar Inuit) teaches science and technology studies in Michigan State University’s Lyman Briggs School and is a coordinating faculty member in the American Indian Studies Program. His current research and teaching interests are in indigenous science, representations of Native people in film, children’s literature, other forms of popular culture, and Inuit literature. He has a forthcoming article on representations of the Inuit in children’s literature and is completing a book manuscript on neuroscience and contemporary American literature.

Eva Marie Garroutte is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and is an assistant professor of sociology at Boston College.

Roseanne Hoefel was an associate dean of the College of Letters and Science and an associate professor of English and women’s studies at the University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh. She passed away in May 2001.

Daniel Heath Justice is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and a Ph.D. student in the Department of English at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He welcomes feedback at outlandcherokee@hotmail.com.

Susan Applegate Krouse is a professor in the Department of Anthropology at Michigan State University. [End Page 326]

Page Rozelle, a Ph.D. student at the Florida State University School of Theatre, has a special interest in the interplay between historical events and theatrical representations of American Indians.

Hilary N. Weaver is an assistant professor in the School of Social Work at the State University of New York at Buffalo, where she teaches courses in interventions and multi-cultural issues. Much of her work focuses on cross-cultural issues in social work with an emphasis on Native Americans. [End Page 327]

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Additional Information

ISSN
1534-1828
Print ISSN
0095-182X
Pages
pp. 326-327
Launched on MUSE
2001-06-01
Open Access
No
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