Abstract

This article explores the national identities that were constructed in Britain in and around memorial activity in the aftermath of the Great War, and attempts to set them in context. It is argued that the same memorial acts could suggest identities that were both international in their vision and also narrowly national. Indeed, the tensions evident in the discourse of identity embodied in memorial activity indicate that the idea of the nation itself was contested. That the same soldiers could have died for Britain, the Empire, Europe and England acts as a practical case study of the shifting and chimerical nature of national identity in modern Britain.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1994
Print ISSN
0935-560X
Pages
pp. 89-120
Launched on MUSE
2008-04-19
Open Access
No
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