Abstract

Little is known about the impact of vaccine shortages on vaccination rates among disadvantaged populations in the United States. We compared factors associated with influenza vaccination rates during a vaccine shortage (2004–2005) and a non-shortage (2003–2004) year among adults in predominantly minority New York City neighborhoods. Thirty-one percent of participants received influenza vaccine during the non-shortage year compared with 18% during the shortage. While fewer people received the influenza vaccine during the shortage, a higher proportion of the vaccinated were in a high-risk group (68% vs. 52%, respectively). People were less likely to have been vaccinated during the shortage if they were Black. This study suggests that vaccination rates were lower during the shortage period among Blacks and those who are not explicitly a focus of national vaccination outreach campaigns. Such groups are less likely to be vaccinated when vaccines are scarce.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1548-6869
Print ISSN
1049-2089
Pages
pp. 611-624
Launched on MUSE
2008-05-08
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.