Abstract

Income produces health, and sickness negatively affects earnings. These two factors likely explain the income gradient in health, but each has very different policy implications. In this paper, I examine graphical trends in mortality risk between low-income and higher-income people by age and gender. These trends suggest that forward causality (income affecting health) is more important than reverse causality (health affecting income) in the income-health gradient. However, there is some evidence to suggest that reverse causality plays an important role for younger men.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-6869
Print ISSN
1049-2089
Pages
pp. 574-579
Launched on MUSE
2008-05-08
Open Access
No
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