Abstract

There is an international movement that advocates the establishment of quotas for women, especially in political and governmental positions. Partly as a result of its initiatives and efforts, countries have introduced legislation that endorses its spirit. These efforts have been important in addressing the gender gap; however, the means of articulating these legislative measures and implementing them vary from country to another. This article focuses on the textual formulation of the Quota Bill (2001) in Niger and how secularist and Islamist political elite women responded to it during the debate that led to its legal adoption.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-1978
Print ISSN
0001-9887
Pages
pp. 21-36
Launched on MUSE
2008-04-03
Open Access
No
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